makingqueerhistory:

Every once in a while when there is an influx of followers, it can be helpful for both the newcomers and the oldstayers for us to go over what our project is about, so that is what we are doing here.

Making Queer History is a queer history project that is highly focused on global coverage, trying to keep from focusing too long on any one country or event. We have covered history in over fifty different countries and have hired authors from around the globe to write them. (If you want to browse by country here you go)

We have written well over one hundred articles, with none of them going longer than three thousand words. Which may not seem like something to brag about, but we think it is. Because at Making Queer History we aren’t trying to find every scrap of information about a short list of events and people, we are looking to share as many stories as possible so you will find one to fall in love with and research more.

We do not intend to be someones only stop in the researching of queer history, we just want to be someones first step into some of the many stories we have researched over the years. 

That is why we always work to recommend other resources and make sure that the sources at the end of our articles are mostly free for our audience to access.

While Making Queer History is not attempting to be everything for everyone, we try to have something for everyone. 

With a podcast for the auditory learners, short articles for those who only have a little portion of their time to share with us, art sharing for the more visual learners, and a regular program that highlights other queer creators for people who want to broaden their range.

Most importantly, we admit that we don’t know everything, and try to admit when we get it wrong. We aren’t ashamed of the mistakes we have made, and are proud to have an audience that will point them out to us again and again. It is important for us to acknowledge when we don’t have all the answers, and we try to keep our focus on telling the stories of the queer community without a need to label every member.

We have included the stories of transgender, nonbinary, asexual, and aromantic people within our project and will continue to do so, and if you ask we will explain our reasons why to the best of our abilities. 

If you are interested in anything you have just read, please check us out. We might have a story in our long list that will spark a desire to learn more about queer history, teach you something you didn’t already know, make you look at the queer community of today in a new way, or just make you smile.

https://www.makingqueerhistory.com/

https://www.patreon.com/queerhistory

makingqueerhistory:

This is so lovely! I am completely in love with it, and it is a great companion to our article!

tha-mi-beo:

Inspired by @makingqueerhistorys article on the Golden Orchid Society I decided it was time to get the gold ink and paints out!

Absolutely love the work they do!

Hello do you know any bi women from old days like 30s or similar time ? I want to read about them if you know any.

It’s really difficult to find explicitly “bi” women from before the 60s/70s because we were all just considered “lesbians” until lesbian separatists kicked up out of our community. I guess many queer women who are considered lesbians in retrospect might have been what we’d now call “bisexual” so… it’s not easy to find them.

I would recommend checking out @makingqueerhistory. Maybe they have some articles about (possibly) bi women from the past. 

Maddie

hi I was wondering if you had any articles on the history of polyamorous relationships? I've been researching the origins of wonder woman and william marston/elizabeth marston/olive byrne and I was wondering what other historical polyam relationships are known about/proven?

We have had the chance to cover a few polyamorous relationships! The first two people that come to mind in that regard are Magnus Hirschfeld, as people rarely talk about this part of his life, and Lesbia Harford because she was vocal about what we now label polyamoury!

I’ve just heard that my namesake Charlotte Brontë was gay. Do you have any sources for this? I’m having trouble finding any but you seem like the folks to ask.

Well, we haven’t written about her in particular, but I read a book called A Secret Sisterhood, which discussed her sexuality a bit and that led me to believe that she was attracted to women. From what I know (which admittedly isn’t a complete understanding of her life) there is evidence that she may have also been attracted to men. 

I can’t answer this one perfectly, but I can say that I think she was queer in some way. 

makingqueerhistory:

every-book-has-a-secret:

geschiedenis-en-talen:

all queer history on here is just US-American or maybe sometimes some UK history as well and it makes me sad that there’s so little information about other countries’ queer history on here 🙁

@makingqueerhistory has some diversity, as of historical queer people, and they’re doing a great job, but there’s a lot of work ahead. 

OP is definitely right, there still is a huge gap in the discussions of queer history, and thank you for recommending us!

This isn’t perfect, and many of these only have one article, but here is our list of countries we have written about. We are hoping to one day have at least one article for every country in the world but as @every-book-has-a-secret there is a lot of work still to do.

Europe

Albania
Austria
Belgium
Czechia
Czech Republic
Denmark
England
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Ireland
Italy
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Russia
Scotland
Slovakia
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland

Africa

Algeria
Cameroon
Egypt
Kenya
Morocco
Nigeria
Senegal
Sierra Leone
South Africa
Uganda

North America

Canada
Costa Rica
Crow Nation
Cuba
Grenada
Jamaica
Menominee Nation
Mexico
Puerto Rico
United States of America

South America

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Guyana
Peru
Trinidad and Tobago
Uruguay

Asia

Afghanistan
Bangladesh
China
Hong Kong
India
Iran
Israel
Japan
Pakistan
The Philippines
South Korea
Sri Lanka
Syria
Turkey

Oceania

Australia
Māori Nation
New Zealand

Antarctica

Antarctica

I love your work and have been for a long time! Thank you for your dedication to queer history. What would you say was the most unexpected upside of working on this project?

Thank you so much! It is so good to know that our work is reaching people! I think the most unexpected side has honestly been the stories that I haven’t meant to write about.

The article about Bajazid Doda is one I am the proudest of, and I started out writing about someone else. Following the footnote to a beautiful story has been a journey I am surprised by every time. 

I worry a lot that someone more qualified, or smarter, or with more resources, should be doing this work instead of me, but finding stories like his, sharing stories like his, I can’t feel unworthy in those moments. I just can’t. 

makingqueerhistory:

andie312856
replied to your link “Reinaldo Arenas: Rewriting Castro’s Legacy — Making Queer History”

Fidel apologized and now Cuba finances gender transition surgery while having one of the lowest infant mortality rates in the hemisphere. How is your country doing on those two?

(This is a reply to our article discussing a gay man from Cuba who was put in a labour camp because of Fidel Castro’s homophobia.)

I think you think I am from American and are attacking me on that basis (I’m not). But fun facts about Canada, we also fund gender confirmation surgeries! It isn’t perfect for sure, but it is funded. If it makes you feel better though, you are right more babies die in Canada and Cuba is rated three slots above us as of 2020

This next part may be a little hard to swallow though, none of this erases the labour camps Fidel Castro put queer people in. Not an apology and not a pissing contest to see who’s country is the best.

Here is an interesting quote from Reinaldo:

“I asked Saint Virgilio Piñera, to give me three years to live so that I could complete my body of work. Saint Virgilio granted me my request. I’m happy. I do wish, though, that I had lived to see Fidel kicked out of Cuba, but I guess it won’t happen during my lifetime. Soon, I hope, his tyranny will end. I feel certain of that.”

Reinaldo wasn’t able to see the end of Fidel’s tyranny, but I was. I chose to honour Reinaldo’s life, a man who loved Cuba and hated Fidel Castro, by loving Cuba and hating Fidel Castro. 

Bless this blog! Much love 💜

Thank you so much for your support!

gamerfreddie:

makingqueerhistory:

theres-no-going-home:

makingqueerhistory:

every-book-has-a-secret:

geschiedenis-en-talen:

all queer history on here is just US-American or maybe sometimes some UK history as well and it makes me sad that there’s so little information about other countries’ queer history on here 🙁

@makingqueerhistory has some diversity, as of historical queer people, and they’re doing a great job, but there’s a lot of work ahead. 

OP is definitely right, there still is a huge gap in the discussions of queer history, and thank you for recommending us!

This isn’t perfect, and many of these only have one article, but here is our list of countries we have written about. We are hoping to one day have at least one article for every country in the world but as @every-book-has-a-secret there is a lot of work still to do.

Europe

Albania
Austria
Belgium
Czechia
Czech Republic
Denmark
England
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Ireland
Italy
Netherlands
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Russia
Scotland
Slovakia
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland

Africa

Algeria
Cameroon
Egypt
Kenya
Morocco
Nigeria
Senegal
Sierra Leone
South Africa
Uganda

North America

Canada
Costa Rica
Crow Nation
Cuba
Grenada
Jamaica
Menominee Nation
Mexico
Puerto Rico
United States of America

South America

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Guyana
Peru
Trinidad and Tobago
Uruguay

Asia

Afghanistan
Bangladesh
China
Hong Kong
India
Iran
Israel
Japan
Pakistan
The Philippines
South Korea
Sri Lanka
Syria
Turkey

Oceania

Australia
Māori Nation
New Zealand

Antarctica

Antarctica

!!! This is what I was looking for! thank you!

Of course! Glad we could help!

Hey why is something about Spain tagged in Portugal? Like, it says that it’s the story of two Spanish teachers who call in love? And the headline is “First Same Sex couple in Spain”?

I’m sorry if there’s more to it than I saw, and in judging a book by its cover, but Spain’s first same sex couple has nothing to do with Portuguese queer history.

While these two do come from Spain and I would say the article primarily focuses on Spain, a part of their lives are spent in Portugal. Many articles are tagged under numerous countries, this one included.

Though the part Portugal plays in their story is small, we still think it is a valuable part of Portuguese history to look at.

I can understand how it could have been confusing considering the title though!