Category: ace

Making Queer History

Making Queer History:

It is finally here! The video is up and you should definitely watch and share it!

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Early Asexual Feminists: The Asexual History of Social Purity Activists and Spinsters

Daria Kerschenbaum is an asexual writer and artist working in New York City. You can follow her on Instagram @Daria_Kersch.

“[…]spinsters were seen as queer, not because they were not mothers or wives, but because they wanted to go into the public sphere and to break the gender boundaries between the private and the public.” — Hellesund Tone (Read Full Article)

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Can’t become a patron right now? We get …

Can’t become a patron right now? We get it! You can still help by sharing queer history with your friends, following us on our other social media, commenting on our articles, and interacting with the project!

Surprise, Red Patrons!

Surprise, Red Patrons!

[Image: White background with a sticker in the center. The sticker is a drawing of a green carnation slightly overlapping a drawing of a violet]

To show how much we genuinely appreciate everyone who supports us, we have a fundraiser exclusive for Red tier patrons too! New red tier patrons will receive a die-cut vinyl sticker with the same floral design featured on all FQH rewards.

Hop on over to our patreon and get yourself some cool rewards!

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We at Making Queer History have been working diligently behind the scenes to prepare for a very special announcement — the first annual Funding Queer History!

Funding Queer History starts today, May 12, and runs until the end of June. New and upgrading patrons not only ensure the future of Making Queer History but also get access to exclusive content and special rewards only available during the fundraiser.

All new and upgrading patrons get access to a bonus episode of the Making Queer History podcast. In addition to the standard patron rewards, new and upgrading patrons from orange all the way to green get a fundraiser exclusive mug. The mug features the FQH floral logo with a green carnation and violet.

New and upgrading patrons from blue to violet get a high-quality enamel pin with the same floral design.

Want to support the project but becoming a patron isn’t an option for the time being? No problem! We understand. For this fundraiser, we’re also offering a tier exclusive to FQH: rainbow patrons! Anyone who makes a one-time donation of $50 or more gets access to the same amazing bonus content and the exclusive FQH pin.

Spreading the word is key, and you’re all an important part of that. Share the fundraiser, learn more about the project, and stay tuned for updates as we go along!

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Regular

Hey y’all! We have some exciting announcements coming tomorrow, including the winner of our giveaway, so stay tuned!

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makingqueerhistory:

[IMAGE DESCRIPTION: “Top 10 reasons for new patrons” over a pastel, brushstroke background]

1. Cool Rewards

Whatever you pledge, you can get awards like stickers, notebooks, and tote bags. At all levels, you get a personalized thank you, early access to the podcast, space at the monthly Skype hangout, and our eternal love. 

2. More Original Content

We love creating articles and podcast for everyone to learn from and enjoy. Sometimes we even have the pleasure of bringing in guest authors!

3. Less Stress = More Focus

The less we have to stress about funds, the more we can focus on content, support, and expansion.

4. The ability to support more queer projects + creators

More patrons mean we can bring in more guest writers to give their unique perspectives and interests. It also means we can support and share more queer-led projects each month. As we grow, we want our community and fellow creators to grow with us.

5. Ability to brainstorm and release new concepts

The more time we’re able to focus solely on this project, the more time we can brainstorm new ways to uplift, empower, educate, and support our community with new and exciting projects!

6. Expand Our Team

The more funding we have, the more folks we can bring into the project. That means new and better quality content. One of this project’s goals is to bring in more team members.

7. Higher Quality Content

The more time, training, and skills we can invest, the better quality content we can produce.

8. Bi-Monthly Chat

Another Patreon goal is to start a bi-monthly chat with all of our patrons!

9. Expansion

We’ve managed to start a website, bring in guest authors, launch various initiatives like Foster a Library, Project of the Month, and #MQHArtContest. We’d love to expand further in 2018!

10. Spreading Queer History

We run a series of articles and a podcast that work to tell the stories of the queer communities history. Above all else, that’s what it’s about; telling those stories not just to learn about our past, but to look toward the future.

Learning queer history is great, but making queer history is far greater.

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coffeeandtheartist:

[ID: Hand lettered “Women’s History Month”. From left to right, portraits of Elagabalus, Clara Bow, Ada “Bricktop” Smith, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Lili Elbe, and Zora Neale Hurston]

SFU becomes first university to offer asexuali…

SFU becomes first university to offer asexuality studies | The Peak: undefined

Langston Hughes: the Poet

Langston Hughes: the Poet:

makingqueerhistory:

Langston Hughes was born to a mixed race couple who divorced shortly after his birth in Missouri in 1902. After both of his parents had gone their separate ways, Hughes was left with his grandparents, who proceeded to raise him as their son. He went to a desegregated school and was the only black student in his class. It could easily be said that the separation he felt when faced with this segregation catalyzed the creation of his poetry. Hughes was known as the class poet and wrote prolifically. From his first poems, we see how he used his experiences with racism as inspiration. This negative experience, however, was not his only influence.

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