Category: answered

do you have any recommendations on books about…

do you have any recommendations on books about queerness in asia, especially central/northern asia and siberia? even asian americans, im not picky at all lol thank you!!

Hi there! I was really excited when I saw your ask; I’m Kazakh, and I’m always interested in exploring more Central Asian queer history. Unfortunately, Kazakhstan isn’t a great place for queer folks, so there’s not a whole lot to be found here aside from “That’s when I Realized I was Nobody”: A Climate of Fear for LGBT People in Kazakhstan by Kyle Knight, a Human Rights Watch report.

There’s unfortunately just very little out there about Central Asia and queerness. Here are some books I was able to find about queerness in Asia in general. I included a couple of fiction books as well.

Fiction

The Carpet Weaver by Nemat Sadat (Out June 2019) This is the one Central Asian book I was able to find, and I’m really excited to read it when it comes out!

This entire list (No Central Asian characters, as far as I can tell)

Nonfiction

Mobile Cultures: New Media in Queer Asia edited by Chris Berry, Fran Martin, Audrey Yue

Queer Asian Cinema: Shadows in the Shade by Andrew Grossman

Gay and Lesbian Asia: Culture, Identity, Community edited by Gerard Sullivan, Peter A. Jackson

Queering Migrations Towards, Form, and Beyond Asia edited by Hugo Córdova Quero, Joseph N. Goh, and Michael Sepidoza Campos

Here are some articles that may interest you as well.

http://www.calvertjournal.com/features/show/9356/new-east-100-shtab-queer-communists-bishkek

https://queerasia.com/qa18-central-asia-and-the-caucasus-in-the-spotlight-roundtable-discussion/

https://queerasia.com/2018/08/27/qa18-bodies-x-borders-reflections-2/

And finally, I’d recommend checking out the org Queer Asia!

I see a lot more gay/bi history than trans his…

I see a lot more gay/bi history than trans history, and i know it can get grey, but do you know any older trans history, with more uplifting than sad tales if you can. Thank you!

Hi there!

Yeah, it can be hard to come by trans history, and it’s super frustrating! Fortunately, there are more and more queer historians and academics working to research and share trans history. We’ve written a few articles about trans folks ourselves! I’ve listed them here from oldest to most recent and noted the ones with happy endings. Enjoy!

Elagabalus, the Empress

Eleanor Rykener

Kristina, Kind of Sweden*

Albert D.J. Cashier

Osh-Tisch, the Warrior*

Alan L. Hart, Part 1 & 2

Victor Barker

Sir Ewan Forbes, the Doctor*

Billy Tipton and the Question of Gender*

Almost Forgotten Voices: The Transvestite Magazine of Weimar Berlin

Jeanette Schmid*

Coccinelle*

Dawn Langley Hall*

Marsha P. Johnson, Pride

Chrystos* (Note: Still Alive)

Maryam Khatoon Molkara, a Woman Who Changed her Country*

Lou Sullivan

Anderson Bigode Herzer, the Poet

Rita Hester, the Beginning of the Transgender Day of Remembrance

Rituparno Ghosh: Exploring the LGBT Community in India

Dwayne Jones and the Dangers of Tragedy Tourism

Victorian era lesbians! Please I'm so cur…

Victorian era lesbians! Please I'm so curious!

Alright! We don’t have a specific article on this, but I am reading a book that I think would be a great place for you to start in terms of looking at Victorian Era Lesbians, and it is the book Surpassing the Love of Man (that is the cheapest copy I could find but check out your library or request it if it isn’t in your range)

Hey, your anon option is not open yet. Anyways…

Hey, your anon option is not open yet. Anyways I just wanted to stop by and say hi. I had been very interested in Kristina of Sweden, specially because of all the ways you can interpret her identity. I remember some time ago, you said you had new information about her and eventually would do another article or something like that. How is it going? There would be a way I could get the sources you talked about? All I can find is in Swedish and I don't know the language

Hello! I also clearly have a deep love for our odd King, and we did say that. I will say with regret that the article isn’t close on the horizon, and generally, I will just add some interesting facts to the already existing article. And when I said that I didn’t know that we would be doing a video on her, so that video ended up getting a lot of the information I was considering writing an article about!

As for sources, I have found so many that I have forgotten to write down when I was just doing research on my downtime, but there should also be some in the description of the video. I hope this helps!

Hi, my friend is doing a paper on a queer hist…

Hi, my friend is doing a paper on a queer historical figure they get to pick. They really want to write about the first person to publicly come out as gay in America (we think it was over radio?) But we can't remember their name. Do you know who that was, and do you have any articles about them handy? Thank you a bunch!!

Hi there! Sorry this is such a late response, I hope it can still be of some use. I think you’re talking about Dale Olson, a writer and agent who represented Rock Hudson and ultimately convinced (and helped) him disclose that he had AIDS. This led to a HUGE shift in the way America looked at AIDS.

Dale Olson actually came out on a televised newscast in the 50s when he was in his early twenties. He was ultimately fired from his job and faced a good amount of backlash, but when asked why he’d do it, he said he wanted to help someone other than himself. I’m paraphrasing a little because I can’t recall the exact quote, but you get the idea.

He was the first national secretary for the Mattachine Society, he a committee member for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and the first openly gay man on television. He and his husband were together for thirty years and got married in 2008. Unfortunately, Olson died in 2012, but he lived what seems to be a happy life.

Just out of curiosity, do you have any resourc…

Just out of curiosity, do you have any resources on homsexuality in pre-modern Islamic communities? I've very loosely heard that there used to be a lot more acceptance for sexual fluidity in the region before the concept of sexuality was politicized and I was wondering how accurate it was.

I think the resource I am currently working through that has covered this topic most expansively is The Construction of Homosexuality by David F. Greenburg, while that is not what it exclusively focuses on that, it does offer some interesting insight into it! I hope that helps!

How do we respond to people who claim that we …

How do we respond to people who claim that we can't label old queers as queer because the terms didn't exist them?

I think everyone can respond differently to this claim depending on the context. For our project, I like to point out that we are not a historical archive, but a resource for people who want to learn about queer history in a way that is easy to understand, while also going into the more complex aspects while trying to stop ourselves from being overburdened by jargon. 

I don’t think we have ever claimed to know exactly what a person would identify by today, and we have worked hard to look at the evolution of language around queerness. But most importantly, we are looking at this history purposefully through a modern lens, this is in our project summary on all of our descriptions of the project. We use words that they didn’t have to understand their lives more easily and find ways to connect history to the present. 

There are amazing projects dissecting how queerness existed in different ways and how the division between sexualities is a more modern concept, but they are able to do that because they are having an academic conversation with lots of time for disclaimers and expansive explanations. That is not what we are doing, and we have always been as upfront about that as possible. 

We believe there is room for both conversations to happen, and encourage the learning and growth on both ends of the spectrum.

But in the end, when push comes to shove we point out that the people of Pompeii had no word for a volcano.

I just felt like sharing this. In my ap gov c…

I just felt like sharing this. In my ap gov class, my teacher would ask us if we had learned an event. The only event he didn't ask about was the Stonewall riot. He just explained. P

Yeah, that is a fair assumption to make, but I am glad he was teaching it, and thank you for sharing that story!

Hi, my friend and I run a queer advice podcast…

Hi, my friend and I run a queer advice podcast called Queerstions, and for pride month we want to do a queer history special. Any suggestions on some lesser known queer people we could talk about? And if your followers have any suggestions (or questions for a normal episode), they can be submitted to our tumblr as well 🙂 thankyou! 😁❤️❤️

Our most recent article about Elvira de la Fuente Chaudoir, A.K.A Agent Bronx is probably one of my favorite most recent examples of a less well known queer person, so that would probably be my suggestion!

Any factoids/generally interesting information…

Any factoids/generally interesting information about lavender marriages? I’ve been gay on this earth for 22 years yet somehow I only just learned a few days ago they were fairly commonplace.

I know we have written about The Marriage of Jane and Paul Bowles which was a lavender marriage, but the concept of lavender marriages as a generalized thing yet. But I would definitely check out that article if you are interested.