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Lou Sullivan

To make a community is to come together. For queer folks, we often have to fight for that community. But what of those who are a part of multiple communities; those who do the work to bring communities together? For Lou Sullivan, pioneer of the grassroots FTM movement, it meant paving the way for himself and other gay trans men. (Read Full Article)

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Cássia Eller

To talk about an artist is all too often to talk about their work. An artist’s creations can say much more about the person creating than was ever intended and can give us insight into their minds that we would never have had access to otherwise. It becomes difficult when there is a language barrier between the artist and oneself. There are translations of course, but so many translations are robotic at best, literally so if google translate is the only option. Instead, we can look to the impact of their work, and the effect their art had on their community. This is what we will be doing as we look at Cássia Eller, a Brazilian rock and MPB musician. (Read Full Article)

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40 Years Ago, Mexico Released a Trans-Themed F…

40 Years Ago, Mexico Released a Trans-Themed Film Better Than Most Trans Cinema Today:

elierlick:

Not only was the film the first of Mexican cinema to be supportive of queer or trans struggles, it also presented audiences with an understanding of the sexual and physical violence faced by trans women and sex workers. Read the full article here. You can watch the movie on Youtube.

Regular

makingqueerhistory:

Don’t let people convince you that queer history is unimportant. That we are a side note, that our identities aren’t important enough to be mentioned in anything but the footnotes. While you cannot blame any one source for the erasure of our history you most certainly can hold every source accountable. Don’t let people off the hook for a second when they try to ignore the history of our community, we deserve better.

Regular

makingqueerhistory:

Queer history did not start with Stonewall. That doesn’t make Stonewall unimportant but it is critical to realize that by only talking about queer history in context of Stonewall and America is erasure, and feeds into the attitude that queerness is somehow a recent development.

Even if it is not intentional, the impact of not directly addressing the fact that there are queer people and queer movements before Stonewall is harmful.  

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[Image Description: A portrait of Lord Byron dressed in fine clothes and jewels, with hair styled, looking off into the distance.]

Redefining the Dandy: The Asexual Man of Fashion

Daria Kerschenbaum is an asexual writer and artist working in New York City. You can follow her on Instagram @Daria_Kersch.

Dandies appeared on the page, stage, and European streets beginning in the nineteenth century, reaching into the twentieth century. Although these men were slaves to fashion, they pioneered a new mode of queer expression still emulated today, both in gender expression and in lifestyle. (Read Full Article)

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[Image Description: Jacqueline-Charlotte Dufresnoy, a white trans woman with curled and styled orange hair. She is wearing a white camisole nightgown and poses facing the camera.]

Coccinelle

A sentiment that is found all throughout our project is the idea that just by existing queer people have the ability to change the world. This idea is rooted in the fact that by living and thriving in a world that wants you to be ashamed and erased, you are performing your own subtle revolution. And while subtly was not exactly Jacqueline-Charlotte Dufresnoy’s forte, we find this basic philosophy very visible in the impact her life left. (Read Full Article)

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[Image Description: A bust of Zimri-Lim. The nose has been broken off.]

Zimri-Lim, King of Mari

For this week’s article, we will be going farther back than we have in a while, which also means we will be working with less information and primary sources than we usually have access to. Information about this man only became available in 1933 when the ancient city of Mari was discovered in Syria. There they discovered 20,000 tablets filled with writings. More than 3000 of these tablets are letters, one of which reveals that the King of Mari, Zimri-Lim, had male lovers. (Read Full Article)

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100+ LGBTQ Black Women You Should Know: The Ep…

100+ LGBTQ Black Women You Should Know: The Epic Black History Month Megapost:

Black lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer and transgender women represent a vibrant and visible portion of the LGBTQ community. In addition to the legends of the Harlem Renaissance and the decades of groundbreaking activism spearheaded by women like Audre Lorde, Barbara Smith and Angela Davis, many of the most prominent coming out stories of the past two years have been black women like Brittney Griner, Raven-Symonè, Diana King and Robin Roberts. Meanwhile, Laverne Cox and Janet Mockhave become the most visible transgender women in media.

So, in honor of Black History Month, below you’ll find over 100 lesbian, bisexual, gay, queer and transgender women you should know about. If she was still alive, the oldest person in this list would be 189 years old. The youngest person on this list is a mere 21 years of age. Like all our lists of this sort, this post aims to contain a wide variety of humans of all ages and backgrounds, from reality TV show stars (despite its numerous failings, Reality TV has been a major mainstream source of LGBTQ visibility dating back to the early ’90s) to State Representatives to actresses to game-changing activists.

Keep in mind, there are so many more prominent black LGBT women than are represented below. This list isn’t representative or comprehensive, but I did aim to include the “big names” and beyond that, present a broad and diverse range of visible women. The hardest part of making this list was that it was originally twice as long! So please feel free to share some of your heroes in the comments and we’ll have more lists like this in the future!

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Queer Crips: Reclaiming Language

There is something powerful in reclaiming language. There’s the shock value of it, but it’s also a way to take back some of the power. It’s a way to navigate a difficult experience; it’s not right for every person, but for many, it’s empowering. For queer crips, it’s a way to connect, to reject, and to describe the experience of feeling trapped between two communities. (Read Full Article)

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