Category: disabled

But the deeper answer is that accepting my disabled identity was necessary before I could accept my queer one, and for me this has been a long, hard-fought struggle.

Thank you for reblogging the nurse and transgender patient treatment article. I sent it to my roommate who is studying to be a nurse bc she told me how her class on culturally competent care was *not* informative (haven't heard back from her). I told her in a kinda offhand comment that I'm nb (but f according to the school) and she was really chill about it, which was nice. And, really, thank you for your entire blog. It's a joy to read your supportive responses, posts, and reblogs

I’m so glad it was helpful for you! I was also really excited about it. Healthcare is a really tricky subject for a lot of folx, especially disabled queer and trans people. It’s a huge topic of interest for me. I’m glad you got something out of it and were able to share it!

I’m happy that this blog can be a supportive and educational space for folx!

queerability:

Image: a black man in a wheelchair on a city street.

Eddie Ndopu Is Ready, Willing and Able to Conquer Space

“I am a black, queer, feminist thinker. I move through this world as black, as queer, as disabled – but I also just want to live my best life. I don’t want to live in a world where my identity is visceral at every turn. But I exist in a world that doesn’t care about black people nor queer people – and definitely not people living with disabilities.”

queerability:

Image: a black man in a wheelchair on a city street.

Eddie Ndopu Is Ready, Willing and Able to Conquer Space

“I am a black, queer, feminist thinker. I move through this world as black, as queer, as disabled – but I also just want to live my best life. I don’t want to live in a world where my identity is visceral at every turn. But I exist in a world that doesn’t care about black people nor queer people – and definitely not people living with disabilities.”

fancyphobic:

transstudent:

Is anyone interested in editing an upcoming publication on queerness and disability from one of our members? Learn more below!

“My name Dani Henri and I go by he/him pronouns. I am a disabled trans guy who is a newer member of TSER. Recently I experienced ableism in online and offline LGBTQIA+ spaces. Because of this, I wanted to make an infographic about ableism in LGBTQIA spaces. However, after creating a survey for disabled LGBTQIA+ folks and getting over 250 responses, I decided to write a full manual about making LGBTQIA+ spaces more accessible. It also discusses spoon theory and other concepts to show the disabled point of view in the community. 

Want to fight ableism with me? Here’s how you can help: I need people to read for grammatical errors in the document. It’s currently 27 pages including charts, data, and fillers from the survey. Multiple people are needed. You can message us if you’re interested and I will add you Google Doc! You can edit at your leisure. This is a topic that’s super close to my heart and I would really appreciate the help. – Dani”

[Caption: An infographic titled “Have you ever been unable to attend an LGBTQIA+ space due to lack of accommodation” in black text, with a circle graph, 34.9% is written on the smaller red slice of the circle, the rest is blue and has “65.1%” written on it, both in small white text. To the right of the screen there is the key where it explains that the blue is how many people answered “yes” and the red i show many people answered “no” to the title question]

“It is not now or ever okay with disabled lesbians to be regarded as inferior. The truth is that we, the impossible disabled lesbians, are valuable; in fact, we are necessary for the strength, growth, and survival of all lesbian communities.”

Edwina Franchild

“Disabled lesbians face at least triple oppression – as disabled people, as women and as lesbians.”

Joanne Doucette