Category: feminism

40 Years Ago, Mexico Released a Trans-Themed Film Better Than Most Trans Cinema Today:

elierlick:

Not only was the film the first of Mexican cinema to be supportive of queer or trans struggles, it also presented audiences with an understanding of the sexual and physical violence faced by trans women and sex workers. Read the full article here. You can watch the movie on Youtube.

elierlick:

Police wear pride flags for publicity, to avoid critique, and to escape accountability for being fundamentally anti-Black/indigenous/queer/woman. We wear pride flags for revolution, resistance, and survival. Police are not our allies.

transstudent:

When Walking While Trans Is a Crime

The NYPD says it’s taking a more sensitive approach to sex work, but not everyone benefits.

“People always think of a trans woman: ‘You have to sell sex. That’s your dominant job.’ And that’s not what everybody does.”

Read the full article in The Cut.

elierlick:

Last week, an anti-transgender lesbian told me I couldn’t call myself a “dyke.” I’m not sure if it’s because I’m not exclusively attracted to women or if it’s that I’m a trans woman. Either way, this word is a reclaimed slur for anyone who’s a woman attracted to women (and usually people who dress along the masculine spectrum). I’m trans, queer, and attracted to multiple genders. That doesn’t negate my womanhood or attraction to women. 

Here’s some history for you: “dyke” emerged as a term in the mid 19th century to describe a well-dressed man. The term took on the original pejorative meaning as “bullydyke” in the late 1920’s following its coinage. However, by the 1970’s the term was widely reclaimed. Publications like the Women’s Press Collective encouraged the use of dyke to make it our own. I should also note that most of the members of the WPC supported trans women themselves. 

By the late 1970’s, the community dropped “bull” from the term. It quickly gained new popularity with the Alison Bechdel (another lesbian who supports trans women) comic “Dykes to Watch Out For” in 1983. Finally, “dyke” entered the mainstream as the first national Dyke March took place in Washington, D.C. in 1993. Held without a permit, it was organized by the Lesbian Avengers, a trans-inclusive group of radical women who loved women. They took part in direct actions around the country for decades. Many of the members did not identify as lesbians but instead as transgender, bisexual, or pansexual among other identities. Dyke is meant to include any woman who is attracted to women. To claim otherwise is not only inaccurate but also ahistorical.

The work of civil rights history is queer and feminist. It’s bigger than one man. It’s also a hard, rough, incomplete project. And so, we must lock our knees, we must straighten our backs. We must never give up. We must keep working, always working, for our freedom.

transstudent:

What can intersex look like?

“My intersex variation is gonadal dysgenesis. I found out at age 15 when I still hadn’t gotten a period. I have XY chromosomes and I have to take estrogen to help my bone health because I was born without ovaries.”

“My intersex variation is congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). I found out at birth. CAH is one of few intersex variations with additional medical considerations, because it affects the body’s ability to produce stress hormones. I take testosterone and I identify as transgender.”

“My intersex variation is complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). That means my body developed in a way that is “tipically” female, but I was born with XY chromosomes and internal testes instead of ovaries. My body is insensitive to testosterone, so it converts it to estrogen instead.“

"My intersex variation is parcial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS). That means I only partially responded to testosterone in the womb. (Because of this, people with PAIS may havve an ambiguous sex at birth.) My parents found out I have PAIS when I was born. I have XY chromosomes and I identify as transgender.”

Doctors often encourage surgical removal for female-identified intersex people who have internal testes. However, this is NOT medically necessary and has more to do with society’s views on sex and gender. Removing hormone producing organs makes a person reliant on the medical industry for external hormones! Similar to other LGBT groups, intersex people struggle for bodily autonomy. We may have to fight against surgeries we don’t want.

Learn more from InterAct!

elierlick:

On 9 December 1984, Amelio Robles Ávila, Mexican revolutionary and trans man, died aged 95. Born in 1889, he joined the revolutionary forces and fought under Zapata. He took part in battles, extorted money from oil companies and transported weapons for the revolutionaries. In 1924 he began to live openly as a man, have relationships with women and raise an adopted daughter.

transstudent:

Design our next sticker! 

Want to see your artwork or design all over the country? We’re asking for submissions for our next batch of stickers. We’ve distributed over 100,000 stickers so far and this number will only keep on growing! All of our designs are created by trans people and we’d love to offer new products. We’re looking for anything from slogans on trans flag backgrounds to detailed, empowering artwork. Let creativity be your guide! Stickers are 2″ x 2″ or 3″ x 3″ and buttons are 1.5″ each.

If you’d like to submit something of higher quality off Tumblr, please email tser [at] transstudent.org. If your artwork is selected, you will receive a $50 gift certificate for our merchandise, 100 free copies of your sticker, and 

transstudent:

What can intersex look like?

“My intersex variation is gonadal dysgenesis. I found out at age 15 when I still hadn’t gotten a period. I have XY chromosomes and I have to take estrogen to help my bone health because I was born without ovaries.”

“My intersex variation is congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). I found out at birth. CAH is one of few intersex variations with additional medical considerations, because it affects the body’s ability to produce stress hormones. I take testosterone and I identify as transgender.”

“My intersex variation is complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). That means my body developed in a way that is “tipically” female, but I was born with XY chromosomes and internal testes instead of ovaries. My body is insensitive to testosterone, so it converts it to estrogen instead.“

"My intersex variation is parcial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS). That means I only partially responded to testosterone in the womb. (Because of this, people with PAIS may havve an ambiguous sex at birth.) My parents found out I have PAIS when I was born. I have XY chromosomes and I identify as transgender.”

Doctors often encourage surgical removal for female-identified intersex people who have internal testes. However, this is NOT medically necessary and has more to do with society’s views on sex and gender. Removing hormone producing organs makes a person reliant on the medical industry for external hormones! Similar to other LGBT groups, intersex people struggle for bodily autonomy. We may have to fight against surgeries we don’t want.

Learn more from InterAct!

Ending violence against trans people starts with respecting them in everyday life:

elierlick:

I spoke to The Daily Dot about how anti-trans rhetoric leads to violence for their new article on supporting the trans community. Check it out here.