Category: gay

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Today we got to go to a queer book sale run by ASPECC, and picked up over 30+ queer research books, which we were only able to do because of support from our generous patrons!

If you want to see which books we bought, we show them off on our Lens!

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Simon Tseko Nkoli 

[Image Description: a black man with short black hair and a beard and goatee. He is smiling. He is wearing a leather vest over a black tee shirt with a pink triangle with a raised fist over the word GLOW.]

“If you are Black and gay in South Africa, then it really is all the same closet…inside is darkness and oppression. Outside is freedom.” (Read full article)

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[Image Description: Framed and matted green and white abstract print. Over the print is text that reads “Soon the day will come when science will win victory over injustice, and human love a victory over human hatred and ignorance.”]

We have another new design as voted on by the folks over on Patreon! You can choose next month’s design by becoming a patron yourself.

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Regular

[Image Description: the words “Queer content is not adult content” against a brown background]

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18 Positive Queer News Stories of 2018

2018 was a year full of triumphs and tribulations, and we’re sharing 18 of the nicest things that happened for the queer community this year. (Read Part I & Part II)

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Queer Mythology in the Philippines

There is a long history of acceptance for queer people in the Philippines, dating all the way back to pre-Spanish colonization and conversion to Catholicism. In Filipino mythology, there was always a queer presence. 

Prior to colonization, the Philippines was a polytheistic nation. Deities differed between tribes and regions, and the myths included here were handed down generation after generation through oral tradition. (Read full article)

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Bajazid Doda

The way we tell stories is often just as important as the stories we choose to tell. Today we look at the footnote, the home of many queer people throughout history, and we look closer. (Read full article)

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2018 Queer Holiday Gift Guide

2018 Queer Holiday Gift Guide

Join our 2018 Queer Holiday Gift Guide! Your work could be the perfect gift this holiday season, and we want to make sure it’s seen. Our gift guide features queer artists from around the world offering their art, writing, readings, and more.

This is not just a call for artists, but all queer creators! We want to share your queer businesses, projects, and works. It just takes a quick form telling us about yourself and your work. 

We’ll be accepting submissions through our website through December 1.

And keep an eye out for holiday sales from our very own shop these coming weeks!

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Regular

[ID: purple and green glitter background with the words “Fave queer history books?” in white. There’s a purple smiling heart emoji and black and white books emoji on the sides]

I just finished reading Queer Crips: Disabled Gay Men and Their Stories by Bob Guter and John R. Killacky. I haven’t picked my next book, but wanted to hear your favorite queer history books!

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Elmyr de Hory Part II

He spoke of his life [in Ibiza], saying: 

“It was my kind of place. People seemed to live on terribly small incomes in those days. Anyone who had two hundred dollars a month was considered rich. I became friendly with some of the up-and-coming artists like Edith Sommer, Clifford Smith, and David Walsh. They had great talent, and I had a little more money at my disposal than they did-I wanted to help them, so I bought their work. That’s why I called myself an art collector. I myself, when I first arrived, kept working on my own paintings. I still had hopes that one day I would be a success. I made a series of watercolors of the port and some views of the Old City. But as I got more and more involved with Fernand and Réal, I more and more hid the fact that I was an artist. They were furious when I told them I’d spoken to Ivan Spence, the Englishman who ran the local art gallery, about having a show of my own. Finally, I stopped doing my own work altogether.” (Read full article)

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