Category: trans women

elierlick:

Dyke March, San Francisco 2018

makingqueerhistory:

[ID: A black and white photo fo Jeanette Schmid, a white German woman with big, short hair. She has long eyelashes and she smiles slightly at the camera.]

Jeanette Schmid, the Whistler

(Content Warning: discussion of Nazis and the Holocaust)

We have covered a number of different professions throughout this project: writers, activists, actors, business owners, singers. There is more than enough proof that queer people can (and will) fill any role. So when we approach the subject of this article we aren’t confused by the fact a queer person held the role; we are surprised that this is a role that is held at all. Jeanette Schmid began as a female impersonator and ended up as a professional whistler. (Read Full Article)

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[ID: A black and white photo fo Jeanette Schmid, a white German woman with big, short hair. She has long eyelashes and she smiles slightly at the camera.]

Jeanette Schmid, the Whistler

(Content Warning: discussion of Nazis and the Holocaust)

We have covered a number of different professions throughout this project: writers, activists, actors, business owners, singers. There is more than enough proof that queer people can (and will) fill any role. So when we approach the subject of this article we aren’t confused by the fact a queer person held the role; we are surprised that this is a role that is held at all. Jeanette Schmid began as a female impersonator and ended up as a professional whistler. (Read Full Article)

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Make a One Time Donation

Who was Marsha P. Johnson?

Here’s an article we’ve written about her!

40 Years Ago, Mexico Released a Trans-Themed Film Better Than Most Trans Cinema Today:

elierlick:

Not only was the film the first of Mexican cinema to be supportive of queer or trans struggles, it also presented audiences with an understanding of the sexual and physical violence faced by trans women and sex workers. Read the full article here. You can watch the movie on Youtube.

[Image Description: A stylized portrait of Eleanor Rykener, a white woman wearing blue and white headwear similar to a habit.]

Eleanor Rykener

There is a fine line historians must walk between being thoughtful in using contemporary language for historical figures and erasing queer people from history. While someone from ancient Sumer wouldn’t have used the word “bisexual”, for example, we can discuss how their sexuality and experiences fit this modern term. We walk that line with every article, and we try to do so respectfully. There are, however, those who act under the guise of historical accuracy only to deny queer persons our history, particularly those stories of trans women. (Read Full Article)

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Dating a Trans Person Changed My Partner’s Life:

transstudent:

Follow this artist on Twitter and tumblr! @madygcomics

[Image Description: Jacqueline-Charlotte Dufresnoy, a white trans woman with curled and styled orange hair. She is wearing a white camisole nightgown and poses facing the camera.]

Coccinelle

A sentiment that is found all throughout our project is the idea that just by existing queer people have the ability to change the world. This idea is rooted in the fact that by living and thriving in a world that wants you to be ashamed and erased, you are performing your own subtle revolution. And while subtly was not exactly Jacqueline-Charlotte Dufresnoy’s forte, we find this basic philosophy very visible in the impact her life left. (Read Full Article)

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transstudent:

When Walking While Trans Is a Crime

The NYPD says it’s taking a more sensitive approach to sex work, but not everyone benefits.

“People always think of a trans woman: ‘You have to sell sex. That’s your dominant job.’ And that’s not what everybody does.”

Read the full article in The Cut.

Marsha P. Johnson, Pride:

makingqueerhistory:

“As a transgender woman of colour, who took part in and incited riots, who was also was a sex worker, Marsha P. Johnson is everything that the queer movement has tried to pretend doesn’t exist. She is everything we should be proud of.

She was vocal, talented, generous, and stood up for the queer community time and time again. The reason she has not been forgotten has not been because of the queer community, but because of the people, she knew. Because, though she was pushed aside by some, she was loved by so many others. Her friends have worked to make sure what she has done for the queer community will not be forgotten. Though parts of the community may try to brush her aside, we want to do our best and aid in pushing her into the place in the history books she deserved. She is our history, and she embodied the ideals of pride in its purest form.”

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