Category: transphobia

Over 210,000 People Petition South Korea to Ba…

Over 210,000 People Petition South Korea to Ban Pride Festival:

projectqueer:

Friday marks the 19th anniversary of the Daegu Queer Culture Festival, a weeklong series of events. The festival includes over 100 booths from community organizations, film screenings, and art exhibitions, as well as a Pride parade.

The petitioners, however, labeled the proceedings as “perverse and obscene.”

I feel dumb asking this, but I swear I’v…

I feel dumb asking this, but I swear I’ve googled everywhere and I can’t find the answers I’m looking for. Were lesbians affected by aids in the aids crisis? Bisexual women? I’ve heard of many men passing from it and never women, but I don’t want to be incorrect in my history. I really do feel dumb asking, but, I’m 15 and new to learning queer history as I’m just starting to adjust to being a lesbian. It’s not like they teach this stuff in school. I’m all on my own in learning about it. :/

Never feel silly for asking! You have to learn somewhere, and this is absolutely the space for it! A teacher once told me, “We don’t know until we learn.” Which, yeah, but it’s good to keep in mind sometimes. We’re all learning.

Lesbians, bisexual women, and queer women were absolutely affected by the AIDS crisis. Many women did die. However, it’s complicated. Of all women, trans women were the most affected, especially trans sex workers of color, especially black women. Cis women who only had sex exclusively with cis women were not really at risk via sex*, but of course, that is not the only means of transmission.

For cis WSW, the biggest risk is sharing needles and blood to blood contact. A huge issue was/is thinking there is no risk because there is little to no risk via one mean of transmission. For bi and queer women who have sex with men, especially MSM, there is a risk of transmission via sex, as well as other means. This is all to say that yes, LBQ women died during the AIDS crisis and are still affected today.

The reason you hear mainly about gay men is that in the beginning and for some time after, it was believed that only gay (and eventually bi men) were affected. The initial name for AIDS was gay-related immune deficiency (GRID). “Gay cancer” and “community-acquired immune dysfunction” were also used.

All that said, the biggest effect on LBQ women was social. By far, LBTQ women can be credited with bringing the LGBTQIA+ community together in the first place. Gay and bi men and LBQ women were generally very separate in the 70s. After the AIDS crisis really hit gay and bi men, LBQ women started food banks, blood drives, home care. They went with gay men to doctor’s appointments and hospitals. When people died and funeral homes and cemeteries refused the bodies, they would hold funerals in their homes.

It is rumored that Vito Russo, on his deathbed, said: “Remember the lesbians and what they did for us.”

* ”According to the CDC, there are no confirmed cases of HIV from female-to-female transmission” (Deol, Heath-Toby, Smith, Cahill. HIV Risk for Lesbians, Bisexuals & Other Women Who Have Sex With Women. Women’s Institute at GMHC. June 2009.)

I’d also recommend this list of HIV/AIDS-related books.

Interview: Tornike Kusiani, the Georgian LGBTI…

Interview: Tornike Kusiani, the Georgian LGBTI activist who got attacked from the Police:

How is the relation between LGBT community and the police in Georgia? Is this community subjected to offensive attitudes from the police?

Unfortunately we do not have in the Georgian justice system recorded violence cases that are classified as hate crimes. For instance transgender people are facing violence on a daily basis and being beaten up but the police just watch the perpetrators and then they take them in the police station. Even though we have enacted anti-discriminatory laws in our constitution, it only remains on paper. Homophobia is enforced in every level of the state.

gaywrites: “15 Things Trans People Wish You W…

gaywrites:

“15 Things Trans People Wish You Would Stop Saying To Them,” a Trans Awareness Week photo campaign from GLAAD exposing microaggressions against trans people. (via the Huffington Post)

I feel dumb asking this, but I swear I’v…

I feel dumb asking this, but I swear I’ve googled everywhere and I can’t find the answers I’m looking for. Were lesbians affected by aids in the aids crisis? Bisexual women? I’ve heard of many men passing from it and never women, but I don’t want to be incorrect in my history. I really do feel dumb asking, but, I’m 15 and new to learning queer history as I’m just starting to adjust to being a lesbian. It’s not like they teach this stuff in school. I’m all on my own in learning about it. :/

Never feel silly for asking! You have to learn somewhere, and this is absolutely the space for it! A teacher once told me, “We don’t know until we learn.” Which, yeah, but it’s good to keep in mind sometimes. We’re all learning.

Lesbians, bisexual women, and queer women were absolutely affected by the AIDS crisis. Many women did die. However, it’s complicated. Of all women, trans women were the most affected, especially trans sex workers of color, especially black women. Cis women who only had sex exclusively with cis women were not really at risk via sex*, but of course, that is not the only means of transmission.

For cis WSW, the biggest risk is sharing needles and blood to blood contact. A huge issue was/is thinking there is no risk because there is little to no risk via one mean of transmission. For bi and queer women who have sex with men, especially MSM, there is a risk of transmission via sex, as well as other means. This is all to say that yes, LBQ women died during the AIDS crisis and are still affected today.

The reason you hear mainly about gay men is that in the beginning and for some time after, it was believed that only gay (and eventually bi men) were affected. The initial name for AIDS was gay-related immune deficiency (GRID). “Gay cancer” and “community-acquired immune dysfunction” were also used.

All that said, the biggest effect on LBQ women was social. By far, LBTQ women can be credited with bringing the LGBTQIA+ community together in the first place. Gay and bi men and LBQ women were generally very separate in the 70s. After the AIDS crisis really hit gay and bi men, LBQ women started food banks, blood drives, home care. They went with gay men to doctor’s appointments and hospitals. When people died and funeral homes and cemeteries refused the bodies, they would hold funerals in their homes.

It is rumored that Vito Russo, on his deathbed, said: “Remember the lesbians and what they did for us.”

* ”According to the CDC, there are no confirmed cases of HIV from female-to-female transmission” (Deol, Heath-Toby, Smith, Cahill. HIV Risk for Lesbians, Bisexuals & Other Women Who Have Sex With Women. Women’s Institute at GMHC. June 2009.)

I’d also recommend this list of HIV/AIDS-related books.

makingqueerhistory: Dwayne Jones and the Dang…

makingqueerhistory:

Dwayne Jones and the Dangers of Tragedy Tourism

For our third article in Black History Month we will be moving to a more difficult topic and discuss the life and murder of Dwayne Jones. So before we begin we want to give a trigger warning; we will be discussing violent homophobia, transphobia, and death, so anyone who finds those topics potentially triggering- our next article will be out in a couple of days and we’ll make sure to find a happier topic. We will indicate where we explicitly discuss the details of her death with an asterisk when we start and one when we move on from the details, but there will be discussion around the event for the entire article. So please do what is best for yourself, whatever that may be. (Read full article here.)

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Rita Hester, the Beginning of the Transgender …

Rita Hester, the Beginning of the Transgender Day of Remembrance:

makingqueerhistory:

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Two Texas teachers keep their jobs after trans…

Two Texas teachers keep their jobs after transphobic and Islamophobic tweets:

gaywrites:

Two middle school teachers from McKinney, Texas are apparently keeping their jobs after it was discovered that they tweeted horrible, inaccurate things about Islam and about transgender people. 

As far back as 2015, teachers Justin Barton and Mark Russell tweeted that Islam is a “satanic death cult” and that being trans is a mental illness. The school district said that while it doesn’t agree with their statements, it recognizes the teachers’ right to freedom of speech.

DFW Trans Kids and Families and the Gay and Lesbian Alliance of North Texas also plan to write a joint letter to the district asking for a meeting, as well as training and education on transgender and LGBT individuals.

“This is dangerous for our children when they hear and see these kind of things, especially when coming from people they may look up to like a school teacher or administration of a school,” said Melissa Ballard, co-founder and organizer of DFW Trans Kids and Families. “It’s hard enough for them to be themselves.”

The group, which includes more than 200 transgender children, includes kids and families in McKinney ISD. Ballard said she knows of no members at Cockrill Middle School.

“When you’re a representative of an organization that’s suppose to protect and lift up, especially the most vulnerable — the children — I think you need to be more cognizant of what you’re saying and what you’re putting out there,” she said.

Yes, freedom of speech is important, but how can people who publicly make such bigoted statements be trusted to treat all their students equally?

Ultimately, this is a danger to students, and it sets a precedent for other kids about what kind of statements are and are not okay both in the classroom and outside of it. (And none of this is okay.) Whatever happens next, I hope everyone acts first and foremost with the students’ wellbeing in mind.