Category: tw holocaust

The End of the World War 2 Series

The End of the World War 2 Series:

The experiences of people during the Holocaust differ in extremes, of course, and there is no way to properly compare pain like that, Saying that any group had it worse than another is a gross and irresponsible simplification of a complex situation. So when we look at two different experiences of the Holocaust – that of the queer community versus that of everyone else– it is not intended to diminish either. Both are important stories to be told, and both deserve equal weight, but one of them does not get the attention it deserves.

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Queer Women and AFAB People During the Holocau…

Queer Women and AFAB People During the Holocaust:

makingqueerhistory:

This article contains mentions of forced sex work, corrective rape, and forced pregnancy.

This suffering of queer women and AFAB people is not to be taken lightly. In the theme of our articles, it would be irresponsible of us to overlook this part of history. It would be just as irresponsible, however, for us not to warn our readers about potentially triggering topics. If you can continue reading, we encourage you to do so. If you are not, next week, we will discuss the life and efforts of Josephine Baker.

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Regular

overexciteddragon:

Finding out you’re queer and trans later in life is so fucking weird, because… suddenly all those horrifying stories are yours. Your people were decimated by the church and police for ages, your people were put into concentration camps and burned to death during WWII, your people were dropping dead day after day during the AIDS outbreak, your people were literally illegal under the eyes of the law for the longest fucking time.

These stories, about WWII and the AIDS outbreak and so on, we learn about this in school, we see these stories as a far off reality, with a limited level of empathy. “I feel bad for them.” “It must’ve been horrifying for them.” Then suddenly you’re them. You’re trans, you’re queer, if you were alive during WWII you could’ve been stapled with a pink triangle and sent to starve or burn in a camp, if you were alive during the 80s you could’ve slowly withered away in unbearable pain in a hospital bed after losing all your friends, you could’ve been arrested for kissing your lover, could’ve been sent to a horrid mental institution for embracing your identity where they would torture you until there was nothing left.

It could’ve been you. It could’ve been me.

This is such a strong fucking thing to realize. As I grew and learned about all of those things I had no idea that it was my history as well, I had absolutely no clue that the things that made my stomach turn in history class we’re going to be my past, the past of my people, my brothers and sisters and siblings, dead, raped, tortured, burned, shot, murdered.

It’s such a horrifying and yet mesmerizing truth.

Now we shout to the world how fucking gay we are, now we wear rainbows like spoils of war, now we hold hands with our lovers and keep our heads up, now we flaunt our identities with Pride.

We’re still far off from ideal. There are still places in the world in which we can be killed, arrested, tortured, all of that legally, encouraged even. But we’re getting there.

I hope our past brothers, sisters and siblings are proud of us, because I know for a fact I’m proud of them.

Regular

jewish-privilege:

Today is International Holocaust Remembrance Day. 

Today we remember the more than 11 million people, Jewish and Gentile, who were slaughtered in the death camps, who succumbed to disease and the elements in concentration camps, who were sterilized to prevent the “dilution” of the “Aryan race,” who were worked to death, or nearly, in the works camps, who were imprisoned for their political or religious beliefs, who were sterilized or killed for being considered disabled, who were gassed to death in the Einsatzgruppen mobile gas chambers, who were shot into graves they had been forced the dig, and those who managed to survive all of that and were forced to remember the horrors they had seen and experienced.

May they rest in peace, may their memory be a blessing, may peace be upon them, and may we all say Never Again.

gif87a-com:

gif87a-com:

The Book of Names lists each person murdered at Auschwitz

nonbinarysapphic: gemfyre: lauralandons: the…

nonbinarysapphic:

gemfyre:

lauralandons:

thereadersmuse:

jehovahhthickness:

lightning-st0rm:

pearlmito:

smootymormonhelldream:

stripedsilverfeline:

anti-clerical:

ramirezbundydahmer:

When the Nazi concentration camps were liberated by the Allies, it was a time of great jubilation for the tens of thousands of people incarcerated in them. But an often forgotten fact of this time is that prisoners who happened to be wearing the pink triangle (the Nazis’ way of marking and identifying homosexuals) were forced to serve out the rest of their sentence. This was due to a part of German law simply known as “Paragraph 175” which criminalized homosexuality. The law wasn’t repealed until 1969.

This should be required learning, internationally. 

You need to know this. You need to remember this. This is not something to swept under the carpet nor be forgotten. 

Never. Too many have died for the way they have loved. That needs stop now. 

Make it stop

I did a report on this in my World History class my sophomore year of high school. It was incredibly unsettling.

My teacher shown the class this. Mostly everyone in the class felt uncomfortable. 

I have reblogged this in the past, but it is so ironic that it comes across my dash right now. I a currently working as a docent at my city’s Holocaust Education Center (( I say currently because I’ve also done research and translation for them )) and out current exhibit is one on loan from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum ((USHMM)). This is a little known historical fact that Paragraph 175 was not repealed after the war and those convicted under Nazi laws as a danger to society because they were gay were not released because they had be convicted in a court of law. There was no liberation or justice for them as they weren’t considered criminals, or even victims for that matter. They were criminals who remained persecuted and ostracized and kept on the fringes of society for decades after the war had been won. Paragraph175 wasn’t actually repealed until 1994. And it was only in May 2002, that the German parliament completed legislation to pardon all homosexuals convicted under Paragraph175 during the Nazi era. History has forgotten about these men and women — please educate yourselves so this does not happen again. Remember this history. Remember them.

@mindlesshumor ok how the fuck did I miss this when I’ve studied The Holocaust like nobody’s business??? wtf

Because the history we have left regarding it is literally the contents of this first hand account.

It is a thin little book.

When I first opened it, I wondered why it was so thin.

Why there wasn’t other books like it.

Other first hand accounts.

By the time I finished it, I didn’t wonder anymore.

Further reading:

I, Pierre Seel, Deported Homosexual: A Memoir of Nazi Terror by Pierre Seel

An Underground Life: Memoirs of a Gay Jew in Nazi Berlin by Gad Beck

The Pink Triangle: The Nazi War Against Homosexuals by Richard Plant

Branded By The Pink Triangle by Ken Setterington

Bent by Martin Sherman (fiction; however, it’s often credited with bringing attention to gay Holocaust victims for the first time since the war ended)

This is one of the memorial sculptures in Dachau.  It was erected in the early 60s and is missing the pink triangles.  Because in the early 60s, homosexuality was still a crime in most of the world.
Our tour guide explained why the pink triangles have not been added later – if they were, then folks would assume that they had always been there.  This way people ask “why aren’t there pink triangles?” and somebody can explain why – because in some ways, the rest of the world was as bass-ackwards as Nazi Germany.

can i just say i was literately in a genocide and holocaust class and i didnt even learn this

Queer Women and AFAB People During the Holocau…

Queer Women and AFAB People During the Holocaust:

This article contains mentions of forced sex work, corrective rape, and forced pregnancy.

This suffering of queer women and AFAB people is not to be taken lightly. In the theme of our articles, it would be irresponsible of us to overlook this part of history. It would be just as irresponsible, however, for us not to warn our readers about potentially triggering topics. If you can continue reading, we encourage you to do so. If you are not, next week, we will discuss the life and efforts of Josephine Baker.

MAKE A ONE TIME DONATION

BECOME A PATRON

“I had a chance to read a copy of The Well of Loneliness that had been translated into Polish before…”

“I had a chance to read a copy of The Well of Loneliness that had been translated into Polish before I was taken into the camps. I was a young girl at the time, around twelve or thirteen, and one of the ways I survived the camp was by remembering that book. I wanted to live long enough to kiss a woman.”

A Jewish woman in conversation at the Lesbian Herstory Archives

If your discussion of the Holocaust does not include how queer people were persecuted it is…

If your discussion of the Holocaust does not include how queer people were persecuted it is incomplete. 

Queer Women and AFAB People During the Holocaust

Queer Women and AFAB People During the Holocaust:

makingqueerhistory:

This article contains mentions of forced sex work, corrective rape, and forced pregnancy.


Now, we set the scene. Before the Nazis came to power, Berlin was one of the safer places for queer people in Europe. As discussed in previous articles, Berlin had developed a rich queer culture that embraced open-mindedness and knowledgeable study of queer lives. There were queer bars, clubs, societies, libraries, and so on. Despite the general atmosphere of safety, however, homosexuality between two people societally defined as men was still illegal under Paragraph 175. It is important to note that Paragraph 175 did not make romantic or sexual relationships between two people societally defined as women illegal. This is where many historical summaries of the lives of queer women in Germany stop, but it is not where history stops.

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